Principles of Aseptic Technique in Operating Room

Principles of Aseptic Technique in Operating Room 150 150 Tony Guo

Principles of Aseptic Technique in Operating Room

  • All materials that enter the sterile field must be sterile.
  • If a sterile item comes in contact with an unsterile item, it is contaminated.
  • Contaminated items are removed immediately from the sterile field. If the unsterile item is small (e.g., unopened suture), once it is removed, the area is marked off (i.e., covered with a sterile drape). If the entire field is contaminated, it should be set up again with all new materials.
  • The surgical team working in the operative field must wear sterile gowns and gloves. Once dressed for procedure, they must recognize that the only parts of the gown considered sterile are the front from chest to table level and sleeves to 2 inches above elbow.
  • A wide margin of safety must be maintained between sterile and unsterile fields.
  • Tables are considered sterile only at tabletop level. Items extending beneath this level are considered contaminated.
  • The edges of a sterile package are considered contaminated once the package has been opened. If a sterile package (e.g., package of sutures) is placed on the sterile field, that entire package remains sterile even when opened.
  • Microorganisms travel on airborne particles and will enter the sterile field with excessive air movements and currents.
  • Microorganisms travel by capillary action through moist fabrics, resulting in contamination.
  • Microorganisms harbor on the patient’s and team members’ hair, skin, and respiratory tracts and must be confined by appropriate attire.

 

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